Our Vintage Style at the Fall 2016 Dapper Day

IMG_2311
It’s our bi-annual tradition to go to Dapper Day at Disneyland.  People go to the parks dressed in their best attire, whether its vintage, vintage inspired, modern, or anything in between!  While the style varied a lot between the guests, our group went decidedly 1930s-1940s as we usually do, combining textures and patterns as expertly as possible. Here’s what we wore on that slightly mild November day!

Ethan

IMG_9946-2

If you follow the blog, you’ll notice that this suit was the one that I bought while on Haight-Asbhury in SF!  It is a mid to late 1940s’s double breasted suit (note the lowered buttoning stance and wide, bellied lapels) made of a brown wool with red window pane.  No tailoring was needed; it fit perfectly! Even the pants have no break!  As I said, the suit is a bit “1940s bold” with the lowered button stance, but it works well to make a period look.  I may do a “modern take on 1930’s style”  most days, but Dapper Day is one of the few events that I wear my true vintage looks and go for accuracy.

IMG_9950

The shirt is a custom spearpoint from Natty Shirts (my preferred shirt maker) and is cut from a light denim cloth. Wearing a denim shirt and a tie isn’t a new, GQ invention. People back in the day definitely wore them!  When worn with a retro-striped tie and a collar bar, it looks pretty awesome; the dark colors in play together definitely make this a fall outfit.

Like I said in my guide, a collar bar can make a great vintage look, but make sure that your shirt has a long enough collar.

IMG_9973-2

1940’s wool suit ($150), Custom Spearpoint Shirt from Natty Shirts ($30~), 1930’s tie ($10), Allen Edmonds woven spectators ($40)

Spencer

IMG_9910

Spencer goes for something more 1930’s. How do you know? Well the first tell-tale sign is the jacket. It has a more moderate button stance (compared to my low-1940’s one) and the lapels are much more straight and medium-sized.  He also decided to go with smart separates instead of a full suit, which is “daring” since it means you have to take more colors into consideration.  My outfit is lazy since my jacket and pants were chosen by default.

IMG_9921

Note that Spencer is more adventurous with his pattern mixing. He pairs a striped shirt with a 1930’s “criss cross” striped tie and dotted pocket square. This level of pattern mixing is straight 1930’s.   Bonus points for including a 1939 Mickey Mouse store pin!

IMG_9923

This back-belt makes this jacket incredibly rare and cool.  The belt adds more waist suppression to create a slimmer, fitted silhouette.

IMG_9924

Latch pockets are also a sign of rarity in a 1930’s jacket.

IMG_9916

I know that we said cuffs are an important part to have for a “vintage look” but there are always exceptions to the rule.  The fact that these vintage trousers lack a cuff could be that the previous owner had them lengthened or that the WWII fabric rationing was in effect, preventing tailors from using fabric “excessively”. As cuffs require more length to create, WWII suits and trousers lacked cuffs.  This detail is a sign of the styles of each era of vintage clothing! 

1930’s belted back jacket from Joyride Vintage, Custom Spearpoint Shirt from Natty Shirts, 1930’s tie, Blue 1940’s trousers, vintage suede wingtips. 

Jeremiah

IMG_0008

Jeremiah is probably the best dressed person in the group.  Maybe that’s because I styled him with my own clothes!  Regardless, he is truly the king of the 1930’s style: just look at all those patterns! It’s like an old Laurence Fellows illustration.

He wears a 1930’s houndstooth Jacket (with triple patch pockets), striped spearpoint shirt, geometric printed tie, fair isle sweater vest, plaid pocket square, and modern micropatterened wool pants. Yes, his pants aren’t true vintage, but I still think it works.   The overall vibes of this fall, pattern-mixing outfit is something that I would definitely wear!

IMG_0013

Jeremiah keeps the pin theme going with a “To Hell With Hitler” wartime pin.  Looks great on wider, late 1930’s lapels.

Anthony

IMG_0037

Anthony came all the way from DC to join us for Dapper Day!  While Jeremiah was close to doing a full 1930’s outfit, it is actually Anthony that is the most modern.  He has a 1970’s  ( but who can tell?) pinstripe DB jacket, worn with a spread collar striped shirt, slim foulard tie, and grey trousers.  What makes his more modern than the others you might ask? Well, you’d know if you read my guide.  All joking a side salad, remember that spread collars and slim ties weren’t particularly common in the 1930s-1940s.  Regardless, he has a great look that blends perfectly into fall with its muted colors and masterful pattern mixing.  You can always do something 1930’s inspired even with modern pieces.

IMG_0049

Slip it to him ladies, he’s got 3 patterns at once!

It’s important to note that Anthony found this jacket while at Goodwill with me.  It cost $17.  We may wear suits and tailored clothing all the time, but we still know how to buy smart!

1970’s pinstripe DB jacket, Gagliardi Spread Collar Shirt, Joseph Abboud tie, Thrifted Pants, Johnston & Murphy Shoes 

Some Other Pictures of the Day

IMG_2300

Behind the Scenes of our photoshoots!

 

IMG_0083

 

IMG_2332

Shooting Jeremiah.

IMG_2380

IMG_0239

Picked up this amazing 1930’s biker jacket at the Dapper Day Expo!

 

IMG_0307

Afternoon on the Mark Twain.

 

IMG_2525

The Spring 2016 Gang.

 

IMG_0256

Some artsy shot.

IMG_0462

IMG_0296

Really glad that Anthony made it out here to join us!

IMG_0353

Stereo typical Dapper Day shot, but with real suspenders not clip ons!

IMG_0420-2

IMG_0481

Ice Cream break.

As you can see, it was a pretty fun time!  People weren’t as dressed up as in prior Dapper Days, but it was still great to walk around the park in style.  It also allowed me to experiment with my photography!  Be sure to check out my next article, which will focus on the Street Style of Dapper Day!

Always a pleasure,

Ethan W.

Street x Sprezza

Photography by Ethan W. and Anthony B.

Advertisements

Comment Away!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s